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The Golden Age: 17th-Century Dutch Painting

A VIRTUAL EXHIBITION

The Dutch Republic of the 17th century enjoyed a period of unprecedented wealth and prosperity that became known as the Dutch Golden Age. Along with the economy, the arts flourished in the small European nation, revolutionizing the way art was made – and for whom. The Golden Age: 17th-Century Dutch Art presents a glimpse into this rich and intriguing era in the history of art through an exploration of the unparalleled riches and cultural confidence of the age.


The Golden Age:
17th-Century 

Dutch Painting

The Golden Age:
17th-Century 
Dutch Painting

A VIRTUAL EXHIBITION

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Route Enneigée avec Maison, Environs d'Éragny by Camille Pissarro

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Lyora Pissarro

Lyora, the daughter of Lélia, represents the fifth generation of Pissarro family painters. She is renowned for her colorful, geometric landscapes that celebrate her artistic heritage despite their break with the impressionist tradition. The artist describes her works as creative journeys, “often winding, mostly enchanting and hopefully uplifting.” Monumental and whimsical, her topographical creations represent the Pissarro legacy of artistry updated for a 21st-century audience.

Memories of Snow by Lélia Pissarro

b. 1991

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historic French Quarter 

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New Orleans, LA 70130

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Bords de l’Oise, Environs de Pontoise by Camille Pissarro

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Camille Pissarro

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In the 1830s, the quaint French village of Barbizon unexpectedly emerged as the birthplace of a daring new type of landscape painting. What became known as the Barbizon School was a casual group of painters who shared a passion for painting outdoors en plein air — a revolutionary idea during an age when studio painting and Academic art was at its height. Their goal was, first and foremost, to capture a more realistic and natural representation of the French landscape, while also challenging the existing hierarchy of painting subjects promoted by the French Academy. Traditionally, the landscape was still viewed simply as the setting for more appropriate biblical or mythological narrative scenes. Thanks to the work of the Barbizon painters, the landscape became respected as a subject in its own right.

Theodore Rousseau was the first artist to devote himself to the artistic principles of the Barbizon School, but he was soon followed by Camille Corot, Jean-François Millet and others. Unlike the Neoclassicists and Romantics who proceeded them, these artists were interested in capturing their surroundings in a naturalistic manner, putting on canvas the forms and colors that they saw truthfully and painting directly from nature. These landscape paintings — capturing what was seen without pretense or narration — laid the foundation for the Impressionists of the next generation.

Eugène Boudin, Dunkerque

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Impressionism is the basis upon which modern art stands, emerging in the mid-19th century as the most significant and revolutionary art movement since the Renaissance. At its most basic, it supplanted the prevailing conceptual approach to art with a perceptual one, focusing on the artist’s actual visual experience rather than artistic ideals. Breaking free from the confines of the studio like the Barbizon painters who inspired them, the Impressionists developed a new painterly technique that was best suited to capturing the transitory effects of nature and modern life. Light, loose brushwork and a vibrant palette were adopted in order to best depict the optical effects of light, the play of the sun’s rays and the transient effects of weather. Artists were now interpreting the fleeting atmospheric changes that were right before them.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Les voiliers au bord de mer

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In the decade following the American Civil War, an increase in American wealth led to a rise in prosperous art collectors who turned to France and the newly fashionable Impressionists to fill their walls. In order to compete, an up-and-coming generation of American artists traveled to Paris to study the prevailing artistic styles of the day. By the 1880s, American painters such as William Merritt Chase, Childe Hassam and John Henry Twachtman returned to the United States, bringing with them a distinctly French artistic sensibility.

American Impressionism was born from this new generation. Like the French Impressionists, they depicted scenes of everyday life using natural light, rapid brushwork and a brilliant palette. Unlike the French, however, they were more concerned with painting places that offered a positive sense of national identity. They captured both the natural and urban landscapes with their new style, breaking with the traditional expectations of academic art to usher in the first modern art movement in America. Combining European sophistication with identifiably American subject matter, American Impressionism quickly became popular among the increasing numbers of upper-class patrons, and they became the first contemporary artists to be widely collected by Americans.

John Singer Sargent, Portrait of Laurence Millet

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At the height of Impressionism near the end of the 19th century, the small village of Pont-Aven in northern France attracted a unique group of painters that included the likes of Paul Gauguin, Émile Bernard and Paul Sérusier. Drawn to the rural quaintness of both the town and its peasants, the artists moved towards a new style that combined the spontaneity of the Impressionists with a new mysticism and expressive use of color. Inspired by both Japanese and primitive art, their compositions overall were flattened and simplified, featuring heavy lines and contours as well as intensified, pure colors. The artists’ devotion to an emotional approach to art was ultimately an important first step in the evolution of Expressionism.

Henry Moret, Bateaux De Pêche, Audierne

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M.S. Rau

Located in the heart of the
historic French Quarter 

622 Royal Street
New Orleans, LA 70130


1-888-711-8084

msrau.com
info@rauantiques.com

Get Directions

March 26 - June 4, 2022
Monday - Saturday
9:00 am - 5:15 pm

FREE ADMISSION

GALLERY EXHIBITION

M.S. Rau Gallery
622 Royal Street
New Orleans


The Barbizon School

Impressionism

American Impressionism

Post-Impressionism

March 26 - June 4, 2022
Monday - Saturday
9:00 am - 5:15 pm

FREE ADMISSION

Modern art was born in the mid-19th century, and Impressionism was its catalyst. Challenging the traditional classical ideals of representation championed by the French Academy, the Impressionists and their successors embraced new techniques, transformed their palettes and captured modern subjects in a way never seen before. Their art was a reflection of the dramatic political, industrial and social changes of the mid-19th century, and it helped to visualize a new version of contemporary life. Modern subjects in both rural and urban landscapes were rendered with innovative painting, drawing and print techniques that entirely disrupted prevailing modes of representation. What followed was an artistic revolution unlike anything since the Italian Renaissance, with a legacy that was equally lasting. 

CLAUDE MONET

Though initially shocking, Impressionism eventually became accepted into the mainstream, and both its doctrines and its limitations charted the course of art history into the modern age. American Impressionism, Fauvism and Neo-Impressionism, all falling under the term Post-Impressionism, are counted among its immediate descendants. Each of these paved the way for their own revolutionary styles that were born from the Impressionist legacy. Revolutionaries: The Impressionists and Post-Impressionists brings together paintings from the 19th and early 20th centuries in order to trace the evolution of these movements, which irrevocably changed the face of the art world.

Their art was a reflection of the dramatic political, industrial and social changes of the mid-19th century, and it helped to visualize a new version of contemporary life.

JEAN DUFY

Fauvism

Neo-Impressionism

THE BARBIZON SCHOOL

IMPRESSIONISM

Édouard Manet was one of the first and most important innovators who became associated with the movement, followed closely by Claude Monet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Berthe Morisot, Edgar Degas and Camille Pissarro. Beyond their revolutionary approach to painting, their most avant-garde contribution to art history was their defiant rejection of the official exhibition held at the Paris Salon. Instead, in 1874 a group led by Monet, Degas and Pissarro mounted an alternative exhibition in Paris that broke from artistic conventions, officially launching the Impressionist movement into the public eye.

AMERICAN IMPRESSIONISM

PONT-AVEN SCHOOL

FAUVISM

Emerging in the later years of Post-Impressionism in the early 20th century, Fauvism was a radical movement of loosely connected artists who above all championed the separation of color from its traditional, natural forms. Instead, they used vivid hues to convey the emotional state of the artist, as well as the psychological impact of a scene. Inspired by the various Post-Impressionist styles of van Gogh, Gauguin and Seurat, the Fauves (or “wild beasts”) valued the expression of the artist above all, creating flattened, simplified scenes filled with highly saturated color in order to convey a strong and immediate visual impact. Led by Henri Matisse, the group also included Maurice de Vlaminck, Kees van Dongen and Raoul Dufy, all of whom were instrumental in redefining the role of color and space in art.

Raoul Dufy, Emprunt 6% Souscrivez

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POST-IMPRESSIONISM

Two decades following the birth of Impressionism, the Post-Impressionists emerged as a new generation of artists working in a wide range of distinctive and experimental styles. Both inspired by Impressionism and rebelling against its limitations, they pioneered a new movement that generally preferred a subjective interpretation over a realistic one. Above all, the Post-Impressionists brought about a new era during which painting left behind its traditional, representational role, and instead made manifest the inner mind or soul of the artist. This was widely achieved through a vivid use of color and a subjective interpretation of a scene, and artists drew inspiration from a range of artistic styles from around the globe.

In reality, Post-Impressionism served as an umbrella term for a wide range of artistic styles, from the scientific Pointillism of Georges Seurat and Théo van Rysselberghe to the expressive, psychological canvases of Vincent van Gogh and Paul Gauguin. The former, with its structured, technical approach, is widely regarded as the precursor to Cubism, while the latter paved the way for Abstract Expressionism.

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Henri Lebasque, Jeune fille cousant

NEO-IMPRESSIONISM

The Neo-Impressionists, known for their use of the Pointillist and Divisionist techniques, emerged at the end of the 19th century and remain one of the most distinctive artistic movements in Western history. Unlike the Impressionists who recorded nature and the elusive qualities of light with spontaneity, Neo-Impressionists approached optical phenomena scientifically and relied on color theory to achieve their desired visual effects. Pointillism’s great innovation, developed by the technique’s inventor Georges Seurat, is the use of color theory and an understanding of optics to break up compositions into tiny bits of color that are harmonized by the human eye. 

Raoul Dufy, Emprunt 6% Souscrivez

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Neo-Impressionism is deeply rooted in the color theories developed by French chemist Michel Eugène Chevreul, whose “On the Law of the Simultaneous Contrast of Colors” was published in Paris in 1839. Rather than mixing pigments on the palette, Neo-Impressionists applied dots and dashes of pure color to their canvases using Chevreul’s theories regarding complementary color and the optics of the human eye. The results are mesmerizing, but the technique was also time-consuming, a labor of love requiring careful planning and stamina to complete entire compositions with only the tip of the brush. Thus, interest in Pointillism began to wane at the turn of the century, and many Pointillist painters worked in other styles after experimenting with the technique. 

CLAUDE MONET

Modern art was born in the mid-19th century, and Impressionism was its catalyst. Challenging the traditional classical ideals of representation championed by the French Academy, the Impressionists and their successors embraced new techniques, transformed their palettes and captured modern subjects in a way never seen before. Their art was a reflection of the dramatic political, industrial and social changes of the mid-19th century, and it helped to visualize a new version of contemporary life. Modern subjects in both rural and urban landscapes were rendered with innovative painting, drawing and print techniques that entirely disrupted prevailing modes of representation. What followed was an artistic revolution unlike anything since the Italian Renaissance, with a legacy that was equally lasting.

Though initially shocking, Impressionism eventually became accepted into the mainstream, and both its doctrines and its limitations charted the course of art history into the modern age. American Impressionism, Fauvism and Neo-Impressionism, all falling under the term Post-Impressionism, are counted among its immediate descendants. Each of these paved the way for their own revolutionary styles that were born from the Impressionist legacy. Revolutionaries: The Impressionists and Post-Impressionists brings together paintings from the 19th and early 20th centuries in order to trace the evolution of these movements, which irrevocably changed the face of the art world.

Modern art was born in the mid-19th century, and Impressionism was its catalyst. Challenging the traditional classical ideals of representation championed by the French Academy, the Impressionists and their successors embraced new techniques, transformed their palettes and captured modern subjects in a way never seen before. Their art was a reflection of the dramatic political, industrial and social changes of the mid-19th century, and it helped to visualize a new version of contemporary life. Modern subjects in both rural and urban landscapes were rendered with innovative painting, drawing and print techniques that entirely disrupted prevailing modes of representation. What followed was an artistic revolution unlike anything since the Italian Renaissance, with a legacy that was equally lasting. 

Modern art was born in the mid-19th century, and Impressionism was its catalyst. Challenging the traditional classical ideals of representation championed by the French Academy, the Impressionists and their successors embraced new techniques, transformed their palettes and captured modern subjects in a way never seen before. Their art was a reflection of the dramatic political, industrial and social changes of the mid-19th century, and it helped to visualize a new version of contemporary life. Modern subjects in both rural and urban landscapes were rendered with innovative painting, drawing and print techniques that entirely disrupted prevailing modes of representation. What followed was an artistic revolution unlike anything since the Italian Renaissance, with a legacy that was equally lasting. 

“I have tried to do what is true and not ideal.“
—Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

October 22, 2022 — January 7, 2023
Monday - Saturday
9:00 am - 5:15 pm

FREE ADMISSION

M.S. Rau Gallery
622 Royal Street
New Orleans

GALLERY EXHIBITION

M.S. Rau

Located in the heart of the
historic French Quarter 

622 Royal Street
New Orleans, LA 70130


1-888-711-8084

msrau.com
info@rauantiques.com

Get DirectionsShop the Collection

Discover the M.S. Rau collection
of Impressionist and
Post-Impressionist paintings.

THE IMPRESSIONISTS AND 

POST-IMPRESSIONISTS

Pont-Aven

Henri Martin, Buste de Jeune Fille

REVOLUTIONARIES

IMPRESSIONISM

AMERICAN IMPRESSIONISM

THE BARBIZON SCHOOL

PONT-AVEN SCHOOL

POST-IMPRESSIONISM

FAUVISM

NEO-IMPRESSIONISM

THE IMPRESSIONISTS AND 

POST-IMPRESSIONISTS

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